How to Play Mijam Drums

By Jonra Springs ; Updated September 15, 2017

Things Needed

  • Headphones with 1/8-inch jack
  • Music playing device with 1/8-inch headphone port

You can play Mijam drums along with your favorite recorded music, preset rhythm or create a beat of your own. There are actually no drums involved in Mijam playing. The sticks are cabled to a unit that electronically represents percussion sounds from a drum set. The sticks don't even make contact with anything to produce sounds. The user doesn't play drums, but rather creates the appearance of drumming as the Mijam unit produces the corresponding sounds.

How to Play Mijam Drums

Play solo to acclimate to the sound buttons. Plug a pair of headphones into the Mijam control puck. Press the buttons on the sticks toward or away from you as you whip the sticks to a sudden stop in the air. One stick can play a Tom-tom drum or cymbal sound. The other stick offers bass drum and high hat with a side button to throw in a drum roll for a break.

Play along with a rhythm track. The Mijam unit has a rhythm track that can be adjusted for slow or fast tempo. You can hear the track through headphones plugged into the Mijam along with the sounds you create by whipping the sticks through the air.

Play along with your favorite band. Use recordings on an MP3 player or any other music reproducing device that offers a 1/8-inch headphone port. Plug the 1/8-inch jack from the Mijam into the headphone outlet on the music player. Plug headphones into the Mijam. This brings the music in through the headphones along with the sounds you make with the Mijam sticks.

Tip

The Mijam drums are essentially a toy. Playing with this unit will not provide any training or experience in playing on a drum set.

About the Author

Jonra Springs began writing in 1989. He writes fiction for children and adults and draws on experiences in education, insurance, construction, aviation mechanics and entertainment to create content for various websites. Springs studied liberal arts and computer science at the College of Charleston and Trident Technical College.