How to Paint Sheep

By Lane Cummings
Painting sheep allows you to create full and broad brush strokes.

Sheep are creatures in the animal kingdom that many associate with positive connotations. Sheep appear in various nursery rhymes from "Baa baa black sheep" to "Little Bo Peep". Nearly everyone is familiar with the tactic of counting during times of insomnia, an activity that is centuries old. If you need to paint sheep to create a mural or for set decoration or another creative endeavor, you're in luck. Sheep are one of the easiest animals to render with accuracy and simplicity.

Squeeze out a silver dollar amount of creamy white acrylic paint onto your palette or paper plate. Dip your narrower brush in the paint and draw a large circle. This will be the body of the sheep.

Redip your brush and draw another circle to the left of this large circle, overlapping it slightly. This will be the head of the sheep.

Dip your brush again and go over the line of your larger circle, making it wavy and curvy. Draw two circles in the head where the eyes should be.

Dip your brush into the creamy white paint again and paint in the body of the sheep. Use bold, curvy full strokes to reflect the curly wool of the sheep. Continue in this manner until you've painted in the entire body

Add a loose oval on either side of the sheep's head using your white paint. Shade it in. These will be the ears of the sheep.

Squeeze out a silver dollar amount of black paint onto your palette. Dip your larger brush in the black paint and draw four rectangles coming out of the bottom of the sheep. These are the legs of the sheep. Paint them in with tight, vertical strokes.

Dip your paint brush in the paint again and shade in the face of your sheep. Be careful not to shade in the eyes.

About the Author

Lane Cummings is originally from New York City. She attended the High School of Performing Arts in dance before receiving her Bachelor of Arts in literature and her Master of Arts in Russian literature at the University of Chicago. She has lived in St. Petersburg, Russia, where she lectured and studied Russian. She began writing professionally in 2004 for the "St. Petersburg Times."