How to Get Your Child into Acting

By Contributor

There simply is no guarantee that your child will "make it" in show business no matter what you do. There are some things you can do to increase their chances, but the competition is endless. If you have a child who appears to have a talent for performing and enjoys it, do not rush them out to Hollywood; start with a local class.

Explore your city or state for acting classes that will accept children. An acting class is vital to teach the child the craft and make contacts. Check local universities for summer acting programs, as well as any local professional theaters. If you live in a city with a youth theater, most of them offer acting classes as part of their mission.

Take a high-quality head shot of the child and prepare a resume. The photo must be a head-and-shoulder's shot with the child looking directly into the camera. The child must not be dressed in low-cut clothes or wear heavy makeup. Add any classes or performances the child participants in to the resume.

Seek an agent once the child has some valid resume credits. Agents must be licensed. Always research the background of any agent you encounter. You could also enlist a manager. An agent usually charges 10 to 15 percent of anything the child makes; an agent does not charge upfront fees.

Have the child take auditions whenever possible. Even unsuccessful auditions will give the child some experience. If you live near a university with a film department, make a habit of checking its casting calls for children. Student films are a good way for the child to get used to working in front of cameras.

Find an acting coach and have your child take weekly lessons to build his confidence and ability.

Once you have an agent, you could have auditions several times a week after school. It is up to you to help the child memorize the lines and read them comfortably.

Tip

You may need an entertainment work permit for your child to start acting.