Hilarious Skit Ideas

By Lindsay Holman
Performing a skit is a great way to break the ice in a group setting.

Skits are short, funny plays that can be improvised or scripted. They are usually used in informal settings, such as classrooms or summer camps. Skits can be effective icebreakers for a variety of events and gatherings. Some skits allow for audience participation. While there are many scripted skit ideas to choose from, many skits allow for improvisation, which can have hilarious results.

Bus Stop

All that is required for this skit is a chair and actors; no other preparation is necessary. It begins with one person sitting on a chair and pretending to wait for the bus. A second person approaches the bus stop and tries to get the first person to leave by making them uncomfortable. Once this is accomplished, the second person then takes the first person's place. This can continue for as long as desired, and can also include members of the audience.

Alien Arms

This skit involves two people. One person sits on a chair with their arms behind their back. The second person sits behind the first person and puts their arms underneath the first person's arms. The second person proceeds to act out motions like putting on makeup, getting ready in the morning or cooking, while the first person tries to narrate what he or she is doing. For extra laughs, try using real makeup.

Questions Only

This skit can include as many or as few participants as desired. Ask the audience for suggestions to set the scene, such as a doctor's office, high school cafeteria or a pet shop. Two people then begin by acting out the scene, but may only interact with each other by asking questions. Each question must be answered with another question. If one person accidentally answers in a different way, he or she must exit the stage, and is replaced by another person.

Guess Who?

Before this skit, have the audience write names of characters, people or animals on pieces of paper and place them in a hat. Gather four participants. Have three of the participants draw a name from the hat and act it out. The other person pretends to host a party and has to guess what each person or party guest is pretending to be. The identities of the actors can be kept a secret from the audience or written on a whiteboard for everyone but the party host to see.

About the Author

Lindsay Holman has been writing professionally since 2006. She has been published in the "MacEwan Journalist," the "Saint City News" and on various Web sites, reporting on anything from civic affairs to puppet shows. Holman is a graduate of Grant MacEwan University with a Journalism Diploma, and holds a Bachelor of Arts in English literature from Concordia University College of Alberta.