How do I Make a 72 Inch Tower From Paper?

By Nicole Carlin ; Updated September 15, 2017

Things Needed

  • Sheets of white paper or newspaper
  • Tape
  • Scissors
  • Pencil
Create a paper tower using plain printer paper

Using plain white paper or newspaper you can build a tall paper tower. An extremely tall paper tower that is 72 inches (5 feet) will need a lot of support to stand up straight and you may want to lean the tower up against a wall to keep it steady. Add this tower as the finishing touch on a castle set and customize the walls with crayons and markers.

Turn a sheet of paper so that the long edge is horizontal. Draw a straight line from the bottom left corner diagonally up to the center of the top edge. Draw another line from the center of the top edge diagonally to the bottom right corner. You now have three triangles on the page. Cut out all three triangles.

Put a 2 centimeter fold on the edge opposite the triangle point on all three triangles. The folds of the triangles will create the base of the tower.

Roll pieces of paper tightly and tape them together at the edge to secure.

Tape rolled pieces of paper together where their edges meet. Continue to tape rolled pieces of paper together until you create a structure that is 72 inches tall. Cut the access paper if you need to.

Attach the three triangles to one end of the paper tower. Space them evenly apart from one another at the base and tape them in place. The folded edge should hang off the edge and the fold should be facing outwards.

Stand the tube up straight and tape the folds of the triangle to the floor for more support.

Tip

Decorate the paper tower using crayons and markers.

Warning

Always exercise caution when using scissors.

About the Author

Nicole Carlin is a yoga and dance teacher and founder of POP Fizz Academy in Philadelphia. She obtained a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from Temple University and a Master of Arts in gender and sexuality, politics from Birkbeck University, London. Carlin has written about dance, crafts, travel and alternative health for eHow, Trails.com and Demand Studios.