T-Shirt Cutting Ideas for Kids

By Aube Ergine

Whether it be because of weight gain or loss or another type of change, most of us have faced the problem of having clothes that no longer fit. For children, this often happens when they grow out of clothes or receive hand-me-downs that are too large. While pants and some other clothing can be difficult to modify because of fit, well thought-out cuts in t-shirts can allow children to revamp or complement their wardrobes at a fraction of the cost of shopping for a new one.

Slit It

Cutting slits in a shirt provides a way to give glimpses of or cover part of an underlying layer of clothing. To properly place slits, put on the shirt to be cut over the other layer. Carefully cut a few 6 to 8 inch horizontal slits in the fabric of the shirt. To make more of a window in the top layer enlarge the slit until the desired size is reached. You can also cut shapes into the shirts or cut slits in multiple layers.

Fringe It

Though fringing clothes has not been too "in" since the 1980s, fringes can complement a costume or retro outfit. To add fringes to a shirt, cut perpendicular lines from the bottom edge of the shirt or its arm. Fringes can be made to your specifications depending on the for which you are aiming. Thinner or longer strips will create a shaggier and more revealing look, while thicker or shorter strips will provide a chunkier look with more cover.

Re-Imagine It

Some well-placed cuts can turn a plain t-shirt into another article of clothing. A shirt with the arms cut off can become a smock for art projects, while cutting 1 inch in diameter around the neck of a shirt gives you an 1980s off-the-shoulder shirt. T-shirts can also be re-purposed into clothing for the bottom half of your body; some cutting coupled with a few art supplies can give you a piece that can be worn as a skirt.

Re-Size It

T-shirts can be also re-sized with cutting. Shirts that are too small can be cut up the side and worn over a tank top. Shirts that are too large can be tightened by cutting straight from the bottom of the shirt to right below the armpit on each side and knotting the extra fabric. This is especially useful for souvenir shirts that children have yet to grow into, such as T-shirts from events or school.

About the Author

Aube Ergine began writing professionally for Demand Media in 2010 and has experience with grant writing, activity and event planning, and lesson planning. She has worked with children and youth for 15 years in schools and recreational settings.