Ideas for a Student Talent Show

By Amelia Allonsy

Talent shows are an excellent way to build pride in your school while showcasing talented groups and individuals. The possibilities for talent show acts are virtually endless, although limited by the size of the auditorium or other venue. Typical acts include singing, dancing, baton-twirling, gymnastics, comedy, ventriloquism, and band acts. There are a few different types of talent shows to consider for your school; your choice will largely depend on the reason for showcasing talent.

Showcase

This type of talent show could be hosted by a school organization or club as a fundraiser. This show would spotlight area talent acts and may call for a more formal show. Acts will represent the entire community, so turnout is likely to appeal to a broader range of people beyond the school community. Decorations in black, white, and silver will provide an elegant backdrop to this evening of talent event. White icicle lights over the stage area will set the atmosphere of a starry night.

Gong Shows

These types of talent shows are only for acts with senses of humor. Participants perform their acts and a panel of judges or the audience can vote on whether to allow the participant to continue. If an act is bad or unpopular, a gong is struck to end the performance in the middle of the act. This is a fun talent show if acts are deliberately awful or willing to be ridiculed, but it's easy for an insecure performer to take offense to getting "gonged."

Contests

If you can get community donations, you can make your talent show a contest with prizes to the top act(s). Talent shows showcase a variety of talents, so try to have awards for different categories such as best singing act, best dancing act, best comedian, and best gymnast. An award for the most original act will encourage variety in the talent show. You can also award a grand prize to the best overall act.

While contests do promote sportsmanship, this type of show might discourage participants who may not think they have what it takes to compete.

About the Author

A former cake decorator and competitive horticulturist, Amelia Allonsy is most at home in the kitchen or with her hands in the dirt. She received her Bachelor's degree from West Virginia University. Her work has been published in the San Francisco Chronicle and on other websites.