How to Use Storage Units for Band Practice

By Matt Rennels
Drummers can play all night if they rent the right storage unit.

If your neighbors have called the police on your band for playing music too loud in your studio apartment, or if your wife isn't excited about getting the band back together in your living room, you may want to consider renting a storage unit and moving the band in. The acoustics will likely not win anyone over, but this is an economic solution that many have followed, and if done wisely, will keep everyone happy.

Determine if a storage space for band practice is the correct choice. If your band is only playing for fun or will be performing minimally, the cost may not be worth it. If you don't know already, this would be the right time to learn the band's intentions, before investing in a space.

Search for the right storage unit. Check the phone book, perform a search on the Web, or just listen to word of mouth. Personally check with management to see if they will rent to bands, because not all do. Consider location, especially if you live in a big city and try to find a practice space easily accessible for all band members. Cost should also be considered, weighing price against features, because fees are often added for band usage. A facility's features may include the size of the unit, as well as Wi-Fi connections, soundproof rooms, heat and air conditioning.

Keep your instruments safe. Learn what security features each facility offers and even if they provide a lock, you should likely spend some extra money on a top-of-the-line lock that cannot be cut by bolt cutters, for the safety of your instruments. It is also wise to insure the items that you're storing, so check your home owner’s or renter’s insurance policies to see if your storage items are covered when in self storage, and if not, many self-storage facilities offer storage insurance when you sign your rental agreement.

Make your place comfortable. If you rented a temperature-controlled room, adjust the temperature to prepare for practice, but otherwise, bring along a box fan for each member if it's the dog days of summer and at least two space heaters if it's the dead of winter. Spread band members out within the space provided, facing amps towards each other so everyone can hear since there is no audience to entertain.

Play to your heart's content. Turn the music as loud and play as late into the night as noise ordinances or storage unit guidelines allow.

About the Author

Matt Rennels currently works in the banking industry but is also a writer, writing professionally since 1999. He has written for daily newspapers such as "The Leaf-Chronicle" and "The Kentucky New Era." He holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from Eastern Illinois University.