How to Pitch a Movie to Disney

By Allison Gray

Things Needed

  • Business plan
  • Storyboard
  • Movie script
  • High-resolution printer and print cartridge
  • Design software such as InDesign or Photoshop

Although it may seem impossible to pitch a movie plot to Disney, it is possible to get your idea heard. The entertainment industry is idea-driven, so production companies such as Disney are thirsty for new movie ideas. With preparation, a great pitch and a few connections, you may be able to get your foot in the door to present your movie idea to a Disney representative.

Prepare a script and a storyboard of excerpts of your movie script idea. The storyboard, script should be clean, colorful and professional. Use InDesign, Photoshop or Google Sketch-Up to create eye-catching imagery for your storyboard. Practice pitching your script as you would practice public speaking. Practice speaking clearly, confidently and creatively.

Patent your story idea. You can do this through the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. A patent for an invention is the grant of a property right to the inventor. You can never be too cautious when it comes to copyrighting your work, as your ideas can be stolen if you don't have your pitch or ideas patented.

Attempt to get an agent. It is easier to get personal meetings with Disney executives and producers if you have someone that has a personal relationship with production companies. Visit a website like Script Pimp to find a comprehensive database of possible agencies that could represent your work. Contact at least a dozen agencies and include writing samples, your resume and the Disney script and plan.

If you do not find an agent to represent your work, email or call the Disney production desk to schedule a meeting with the Walt Disney Production Company. After you have secured a meeting to pitch your Disney script, create a follow-up email including an outline of your movie pitch, including animation or Disney Production's contact information is as follows:

Walt Disney Corporation President and CEO of the Walt Disney Company Robert Iger 500 S. Buena Vista Street Burbank, CA 91521 Email: robert.a.iger@disney.com

Be persistent with your agent or with Disney booking agents. If you are not able to get a meeting or if your script was denied, modify your pitch and make edits to your presentation and story line and keep trying.

About the Author

Allison Gray is a communications consultant based in Chicago. She has worked in communications for five years at Meet Minneapolis, Rasmussen College and New School Communications. Published in USAE and PCMA, Gray began writing professionally in 2007. She received a B.A. in strategic communications from the University of Minnesota.