x

How to Make Helmet Plumes

By Nicole Fotheringham ; Updated October 03, 2017
The bouquet plume gives this Roman helmet some pizzazz.

Top off your Greco-Roman helmet in style, adding a feathered plume for the top. Plumes were used to indicate rank or unit. They also were used as decoration during parades. There are different styles of helmet plumes worn by the Trojans, Greeks, Romans, Gauls and others. Make a plume to suit your helmet with some feathers and a few household items. Plumes were traditionally red or black, but feel free to use your creativity.

Bouquet Plume

Gather the feathers together and arrange them into a bouquet. All the feathers should be about the same size and height.

Secure the bottom feather tips with masking tape. Wrap the tape around the feathers as well as at the bottom of the bouquet. Wrap enough tape around the feathers so that they fit snugly into the bottle cap. Apply adhesive to the tape and glue the cap to the feathers. Use the same adhesive to glue the bottle cap to the top of the helmet. Ensure that the adhesive you are using is able to bond plastic to whatever material from which your helmet is made.

Paint over the adhesive with paint that matches the color of your helmet.

Crest Plume

Using the pencil and compass, draw two semicircles on the cardboard edge. Make the bigger semicircle the same size as the top of your helmet. Reduce the size of the compass by about 4 inches for the inside, smaller circle. Use the craft knife to cut out the crescent shape.

Dip the bottom tips of the feathers into white glue. Stand the cardboard crescent up on its side so that you can see the corrugation. Press the glued tips into the holes in the corrugated cardboard. Press feathers into the crest all along the top edge. Ensure that the feathers are all the same height.

Tape the crest to the top of your helmet. Paint the cardboard and the masking tape the same color as your helmet. Leave to to dry.

Tip

You can make the crescent shape cardboard cut out as big or small as you like.

About the Author

Nicole Fotheringham has been a writer since 1997. She was born in South Africa and began as a reporter for the "Natal Mercury" and "Cape Argus" newspapers. Fotheringham has a master's degree in English literature from the University of KwaZulu-Natal.