How to Make an Origami Cricket

By Melissa Fee Adkins ; Updated September 15, 2017

Things Needed

  • 1 square sheet origami paper
  • Marker
Unlike real crickets, this origami cricket is sure to remain silent.

Many people try to avoid insects of all types. However, unlike his real-life brethren, this origami cricket is sure to charm both adults and children. The cartoonish features make the origami cricket useful for school projects or Sunday school crafts.

Fold the origami paper in half diagonally. Turn the paper so that the longest edge is on the top, with the tip of the triangle pointing down.

Fold the left corner to meet the right corner.

Lift the lower-right corner of the top flap. Open the pocket. Flatten the pocket into a square by pressing the former lower-right corner into the lower-left corner. Flip the project over and repeat on the back side.

Turn the project so that the flaps open downward.

Fold the right corner to the center crease until the edges meet. Crease the paper. Repeat with the left corner. Fold the top corner down, like a flap. Unfold the top flap and both the right and left sides. Flip the project over and repeat.

Lift the bottom-center corner of the top flap of paper and fold it upward along the previously made creases. Pull in the left and right edges of the upper flap until the edges meet in the middle. Flip the project over and repeat.

Turn the project so that the side that has a split up the middle -- resembling two "legs" -- is pointing down. Fold the left and right corners in to meet in the middle. Flip the project over and repeat.

Fold down the top corner of the first flap so that the small triangular fold underneath shows. Fold the top corner of the second flap backward until is has a straight edge just visible above the small triangular fold.

Turn the project so that the "legs" are to the right. Fold the middle flap upward in half. Fold the leg at a 45-degree angle upward, then fold 1/8 inch of it down, creating a leg. Flip the project over and repeat.

Draw eyes on the face.

Tip

Use green or light brown paper to make the cricket seem more life-like.

About the Author

Melissa Fee Adkins has been a writer since 2005. She holds a B.A. in English from the University of Michigan.