How to Make a Knight's Shield for a Kid's Party

By Christina Ash
Shields do not have to be just round or rectangular.

Slaying dragons, sword fights and noble deeds -- all could be part of a kid's knight-themed party. With such dangerous pursuits, it’s imperative that the knight have a trusty shield. With just a little imagination and some ordinary craft supplies, any young knight can have a shield that lets the other people at the party know who he is and what he’s fighting for.

Draw a sketch of the shape of shield your child would like. Calculate the dimensions of the shield so that it will not be too big for her to carry.

Make a full-size template for your shield out of brown kraft paper. Fold the brown paper in half and draw half a shield with the black marker, aligning along the center fold. Without opening the paper, cut out the shield along the black markings with scissors. Give your child the shield to hold to check out its size and shape.

Tape the paper template to the cardboard with masking tape. Cut out the shield using the craft knife. Use long strokes to give a clean edge, and round off any sharp edges.

Give your child paper and pencils for him to design a crest for the shield. Cut the shapes out of foam and glue to the shield. Alternately, cut a shape out of foam, or use a ready made shape, to represent an animal and glue it to the cardboard. Apply foam stars, suns and moons for celestial themes or geometric shapes for a more generic look. If the party has a theme, such as Knights of the Round Table, incorporate elements from this into the design.

Paint the shield a metallic color, perhaps bronze or silver, using an acrylic metallic-colored paint. You could use spray paint or acrylic craft paint with a paint brush. Apply the paint all over the shield.

Paint some small foam circles with a different color metallic paint and glue them around the edge of the shield for rivets and studs. Apply holographic stickers to add shine. Add any painted elements that your child would like.

Attach the handle by cutting two horizontal 1-inch slits in the shield. Position these just above and below where your child’s wrist is when he's holding the shield. Run the Velcro strap through the slits from the back to the front and to the back again.

Tip

Consider different shapes of shields: round, oblong, hexagonal or straight at the top and curved at the bottom.

About the Author

Christina Ash has been writing since 1982, throughout her career as a computer consultant, anthropologist and small-business owner. She has published work in various business, technology, academia and popular books and journals. Ash has degrees in computer science, anthropology and science and technology studies from universities in England, Canada and the United States.