How to Make a Happy Meal Box

By Vera Leigh

The next time you take the kids to McDonald's for a Happy Meal, the hamburger chain's signature meal plan for children, save the flimsy cardboard box holding the burger, fries, dessert and surprise toy to use as a model for a sturdier, more personalized version. This craft should entertain your children on a rainy day. Your children will get to explore their creativity and complete a dual-purpose project in just a few hours. The customized Happy Meal box can be used to hold special trinkets, school supplies, art supplies and any other grouped items.

Flatten the box, and cut it along one side of the box binding so that the box is in one long piece.

Trace the outline of the Happy Meal box on a sheet of white poster board. Draw around the finger enclosures on the Golden-Arch handles.

Cut along the outline, and fold the box according to the original folds of the Happy Meal box. Keep one intact Happy Meal box upright on your work table to refer to as a model if possible.

Tape all the sides needing to be fastened, and then begin decorating. Cover the sides and corners where sides come together with scrap paper. Add faux jewels, draw artwork with markers or crayons or attach ribbon to the handles. Let your child explore his creativity.

Tip

Folding your replica box might take several tries. However, once it is covered in colorful paper and bejeweled, you won't able to see mistakes.

Consider foregoing Steps 2 and 3. Instead, cut and flatten your original Happy Meal boxes to allow your children to work with long, flattened canvases. When your little artists are finished decorating the flattened box, tape the box back together inside out so the original design is on the inside of the box. You will skip the pesky task of folding a replica box if you choose this version of the project.

About the Author

Vera Leigh has worked as a professional freelance writer since 2008. Her work has appeared in "Learn Overseas" and "Grad Source" magazines. In addition, she received an honorable mention in "Newsweek's" My Turn contest. She has written features for nonprofits focused on literacy, education, genomics and health. In her spare time, Leigh puts her English major to use by tutoring in grammar and composition.