How to Fly the Microsoft Simulator Using a PS3 Controller

By Alex Ramirez

Microsoft's "Flight Simulator X" is a simulation game that allows you take control of a cockpit and realistically fly a variety of aircraft made from many different shapes and sizes. The game is compatible with many types of joysticks and controllers, including the controller for the PlayStation 3. You will have to manually assign the buttons to the game, but the left analog will automatically act as the plane's control, as you might already be accustomed to if you have used another joystick or controller.

Download the drivers for the PS3 controller you have from QuickJump (see Resources). The drivers are available for free and will be downloaded in a compressed folder.

Extract the files from the downloaded folder with the file extraction program of your choice, such as WinZip, WinRAR, or ExtractNow. To extract the files, right-click the compressed folder, click "Extract..." or "Archive..." and choose a directory to install the files. Any directory will be fine for now.

Double-click and install the file "libusb-win32-filter-bin-0.1.10.1.exe." These are the drivers that make the PlayStation 3 controller compatible with your PC.

Connect your PlayStation 3 controller to your PC via the device's USB cable. A confirmation sound will emit from your computer and a bubble will appear at the bottom-right of screen informing you a new device has become connected.

Double-click the "ps3sixaxis_en.exe" program, which was contained in the folder you downloaded and uncompressed. A window will appear and permanently minimize itself.

Press the "PS" button in the center of your PlayStation 3 controller. The controller will light up, allowing the device to be used in "Flight Simulator X." To use the controller, simply start a flight as normal, except you use the left analog stick of the PlayStation 3 to guide the plane.

About the Author

Alex Ramirez has been a freelance writer since 2006. With a background in public relations, Ramirez has been featured in publications ranging from Gamers Daily News to USA Today. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in public relations from the University of Central Arkansas.