How to Fix a Disc Motor on a PS3 Slim

By Michael Wallace ; Updated September 15, 2017

The PlayStation 3 (PS3) Slim is the thin counterpart to the original PS3 video game console. Like its predecessor, the PS3 Slim uses a variety of internal components to function, and one of the most important components is the disc drive sensor/motor assembly. If your PS3 Slim isn’t reading discs, it could likely be the result of a bad motor. If you are not intimidated by working with electronics, you can open up the unit and fix the problem yourself.

Unplug your PS3 Slim, and remove all of the cables from the front and rear ports on the unit.

Turn the unit over, and use the tip of your screwdriver to pop the plastic covers off of the 11 screws on the bottom of the unit.

Remove the screws.

Turn the unit right-side up, and lift the top cover off of the unit. The Blu-Ray drive will now be exposed in the housing.

Unscrew the screws at the corners of the Blu-Ray drive, and lift the drive up to expose the motor power cable and thick ribbon connector cable at the back of the drive. Check these to make sure they are securely plugged in. If they aren't, plug them in, making sure they are secure.

Reassemble your PS3, and test the unit. If the motor still doesn't work, it may be damaged beyond repair and will need to be replaced.

Disassemble the PS3 to the point where, once again, you can lift up the Blu-Ray drive.

Unplug the cables at the rear of the drive.

Remove all screws from the drive housing.

Remove the top part of the drive housing. This will expose the motor assembly at the rear of the drive.

Remove all screws on the motor assembly, and remove the assembly.

Replace it with a new motor assembly, and replace the screws.

Fit the two halves of the drive together, and replace the screws.

Replace the cable and PS3 housing.

About the Author

Michael Wallace has been a freelance copywriter and journalist since 2003. He served in the U.S. Navy and attended the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. Specializing in writing technical articles, Wallace has contributed to city publications such as "San Diego City Beat."