How to Draw a Ford F350 Short Bed Truck

By Christine Kincaid

If you enjoy drawing cars and trucks, then you might try drawing a Ford F350 short bed truck. Drawing short bed trucks is as easy as drawing regular trucks. The key is to remember that a truck usually stays the same length overall, so if the bed is short, the cab is often long.

Get pictures of a Ford F350 short bed truck (see Resources), or if you own this kind of truck, you can go outside and draw it from real life. Find a good angle that shows off the features you want to include.

Rough out the basic shapes of your truck. The body is a long, horizontal rectangle. The cab is a vertical rectangle with a slanted part for the windshield. When drawing your shapes, consider that a big object, such as a truck, looks good when drawn with foreshortened perspective. This means that the back side of the rectangle will be smaller than the front side because it's further away.

Rouch sketch of truck

Study your drawing. The bed should be short compared to the cab. They may be roughly the same width, depending on your angle. If your F350 has two doors, study them. Does it look like a person could get in and out of both doors? Imagining how your truck would work in real life is key to getting a realistic-looking truck.

Add big details such as the tires, windshield and grill. Add details of how the metal body bends to accommodate the tires and hood. If you're drawing your truck with dually wheels, you'll need to adjust the metal body to accommodate those wheels.

Drawing of truck

Erase some of your guidelines so you can see your truck more easily. Continue adding in finer details, such as the Ford badge, rims and headlights.

Adjust your pencil lines and add shading until you're happy with your truck. Or trace it in pen, erase the pencil and color it with markers. Markers are better than colored pencils for trucks because they look more like shiny paint.

About the Author

Christine Kincaid has been a professional writer since 2004. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in English and has written many non-fiction and fiction pieces over the years. She's been a professional artist since 2002, working primarily as a muralist and scene painter.