How to Bump and Grind

By Ainsley Patterson ; Updated September 15, 2017

Going out to the club on a Friday night is a great way to release a little stress after a week of working. You don't, however, want to show up to the club without knowing how to dance. There are lots of different dances out there that you can learn to do, but one of the easiest dances to learn for a club that plays hip hop is the Bump and Grind.

Stand close to your partner. You can either stand facing each other or you can stand with the girl's back to the guy's front.

Place your hands on each other's hips. Having your hands on each other's hips will keep your pelvic areas close together which is a key part of this dance that many say looks like having sex upright with your clothes on.

Place one of your feet between your partner's feet if you are standing face to face. You and your partner's feet should alternate when you are facing each other, this makes it easier for both of you to move. Bend your knees slightly to allow more movement throughout your hips.

Move your hips in a circular motion in rhythm with the music. You should be moving kind of like you would if you were hoola hooping, with the two of you grinding your pelvic areas together when both of your hips are thrust forward. This is bumping. If you move both of your hips in the same circular motion then this is grinding. In other words, you can either move in a circular motion where you and your partner's pelvic region only come together when they are thrust forward, or you can move them together in a circular motion where you and your partner's pelvic region never separate.

Stand with the female's feet in between the male's feet if the female is standing with her back to the male. Move your hips in sync with your partner's hips. For extra stability she can place her hands on her knees or she can lean back on her partner's chest with her arms up and around his neck.

Tip

Either partner can lead when you bump and grind, just remember that if you are leading you need to pay attention to the rhythm of the music.

About the Author

Based in Ypsilanti, Mich., Ainsley Patterson has been a freelance writer since 2007. Her articles appear on various websites. She especially enjoys utilizing her more than 10 years of craft and sewing experience to write tutorials. Patterson is working on her bachelor's degree in liberal arts at the University of Michigan.