Singer Featherweight Threading Instructions

By Linda Richard
The Featherweight's bobbin case has a latch to make it easy to hold.

The Singer Featherweight sewing machine, or Singer 221, is a lightweight straight-stitch machine manufactured from 1933 to 1964, according to the Planet Patchwork website. It has become a favorite among quilters because it weighs only about 11 lbs., and as such is easy to take to quilting class. Thread the Singer Featherweight much like other models of the era.

Thread and Wind the Bobbin

Release the clutch on the balance wheel on the right side of the machine. Turn the center hand screw toward you to do this. Place the bobbin on the winder spindle at the top right and a spool of thread on the thread spindle

Thread through the thread guide on the top left and down to the tension discs on the lower right. Thread the bobbin from inside out. Push the bobbin against the belt. Hold the thread end and push the foot control. The bobbin will spin and the thread you are holding will break off.

Wind the bobbin until nearly full. Pull the bobbin away from the belt and tighten the hand screw on the balance wheel. Place the bobbin in the bobbin case and pull the thread through the tension control. Hold the bobbin and case by the latch and place it on the bobbin pin. Push the bobbin into place and spin it until it clicks.

Thread the Top

Turn the balance wheel toward you until the take-up arm on the left is in the top position. This raises the needle out of the feed dogs.

Place the spool of thread on the pin and run the thread from the back of the spool to the eye at the top left, then down between the tension discs above the needle and back up to the take-up arm. Catch the eyelet and thread guide above the needle and thread the needle from right to left.

Draw a few inches of thread by pulling it through the needle. Hold the top thread in the left hand while turning the balance wheel toward you. When the take-up arm is in a high position, the bobbin thread should come through the hole. Pull the thread through and to the back.

About the Author

Linda Richard has been a legal writer and antiques appraiser for more than 25 years, and has been writing online for more than 12 years. Richard holds a bachelor's degree in English and business administration. She has operated a small business for more than 20 years. She and her husband enjoy remodeling old houses and are currently working on a 1970s home.