How to Organize a Pitch Card Game Tournament

By Dan Chruscinski
Organize a Pitch card game tournament for fun and prizes.

Pitch is a card game that can be played by two to seven players both individually or in teams. The game revolves around obtaining certain cards to gain points, making it easily adaptable into a tournament format. You can organize a Pitch card game tournament for any number of players by making sure each tournament entrant knows all rules and variations of the game. Once you set up the tournament, your players can proceed with your regulations until one player is declared the winner.

Pick the type of Pitch you want to play at the tournament. Play Pitch with no auction if the tournament will include amateur players or Auction Pitch with advanced players.

Decide whether players will play individually or as pairs. If you choose to have pairs, select the pairs from the tournament players or instruct entrants to bring their partners.

Choose any additional rules you want to play with for the tournament such as allowing a Shoot the Moon Bid, which can win or lose the game if achieved or lost.

Select how each round proceeds. For example, have each round last until one player per table reaches 11 points or have each round last 10 hands with the winner having the highest point total after the final hand.

Choose how players progress in the tournament. For example, have only the winner of each round proceed to the next or have points accumulate and have the highest four point totals at the end of five rounds face off in the final round.

Type up a sheet with all the rules and variations you have selected for the tournament. Print enough copies for every member of the tournament.

Select where the tournament will be held. If you are expecting a large turnout, hold the tournament in a hall or public location. For a tournament of just friends, set up tables around your house.

Set a prize for the tournament. Ask each entrant to pay a small entry fee and divide the money among the first-, second- and third-place finishers.

Send an e-mail or printed invitations to potential entrants. Include the date, time and place of the tournament as well as any instructions the entrants should know such as the entry fee or whether they need to find a partner to play with. Ask that entrants RSVP to the tournament before a set date.

Set the initial rounds using the names of the entrants who responded to the invite. The number of entrants will help you set the number of players per tables. If you have a low turnout, have three players per table while a large turnout should have four players at each table and multiple tables.

Things Needed

  • Printer
  • Paper

About the Author

Dan Chruscinski has written pieces for both business and entertainment venues. His work has appeared in "Screen Magazine" as well as websites such as Starpulse.com. Chruscinski graduated in 2006 with a degree in English literature from Illinois State University.