How to Write a Wrestling Script

By Alan Donahue ; Updated September 15, 2017

World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) is the biggest wrestling promotion in the world and every week they put on multiple shows to entertain viewing audiences. While it may seem like these shows are off the cuff and anything can happen, the complete opposite is true. The show is actually heavily scripted, with almost every moment written on paper. Whether you want to create a wrestling league of your own or write up mock WWE Raw shows, it is easy to format a wrestling script. The hard part is making the material entertaining.

Preparing the Script

Start out with an outline of what you want to do. Episodes of WWE Raw are based on two hours with commercial breaks, so you will want to factor everything into this.

Label the top of the script with the name of the show and the episode number. For example: WWE Raw #664. You can also put another title underneath so that you do not have to constantly refer to the script as #664: “Manic Monster Monday."

Add the date and the location of the event. If you do not know those yet then simply type “TBA” (To Be Announced).

Picture a wrestling broadcast and think of everything that you will want to incorporate. If there is an opening video, pyro, or any graphics that will be used to promote a match later in the night.

Type out any of the events on separate lines and in bold. Start out with the amount of time that it will take, followed by what is actually on screen. Example: (:45) Opening/ Pyro/ Fan Reaction; (:15) GRAPHIC: The Undertaker vs. Kane- CASKET MATCH- TONIGHT!

Put all capital letters on anything that you want to put emphasis on. This will help the announcers and wrestlers who read the script.

Writing the Segments

Start writing the separate segments. Label each segment with a bold underlined title. Put the writer and how long the segment will take underneath this section title.

Use bullet points to begin writing your segment. Start off with any entrances that might occur or if a performer begins in the middle of the ring.

Type out normal lettering for any dialogue that may be used. Example: (Bullet Point) John Cena promo(In Bold): The Champ is Here! Tonight, I will challenge Triple H to a ladder match!! You Can’t See Me!!! (In Regular writing).

Continue this process until the first segment is completed.

Write out matches with certain things that you will want to happen before and after the match, but the rest of the match is planned by wrestling agents and trainers. Next to each match segment, give the announcers a set of story notes that they can go over and use for commentary.

End your script with the main event and a good point to leave off at for viewers. It should be climactic enough to draw an end to the show and also leave the viewer in suspense of the next battle or exhibition.

About the Author

Alan Donahue started writing professionally in 2003. He has been published in the Norwich Free Academy "Red & White," UNLV's "Rebel Yell" and on various websites. He is an expert on wrestling, movies and television. He placed second in the NFO Screenwriting Contest and received filmmaking awards from Manchester Community College and Norwich Free Academy. He currently attends Academy of Art University.