How to Photocopy a 12X12 Scrapbook Page

By Jason Gillikin ; Updated September 15, 2017

Things Needed

  • Scrapbook page, 12 inches by 12 inches
  • Photocopier
  • Tabloid-sized paper (11 x 17 inches)
  • Letter-sized paper (8.5 x 11 inches)
  • Digital camera and printer (optional)
  • Scissors or utility blade
  • Clear tape

What better way to share a well-done scrapbook page than to send a copy to friends or family? A digital image of the page can be emailed or a photocopy can be circulated at trade booths or craft stores. A page that is larger than standard letter-sized paper and/or irregular can easily be copied with a little planning.

Place the scrapbook page on the glass of the photocopier, carefully aligning one corner of the page to the marked corner of the glass.

To make a copy of the page that fits on standard letter-sized paper (8.5 x 11 inches), select a reduction ratio from the copier control panel of 78%. Trim the photocopy using scissors or a utility blade, if desired.

To make a copy of the page that fits on tabloid-sized paper (11 x 17 inches), select a reduction ratio of 92% from the copier control panel. Trim the photocopy using scissors or a utility blade, if desired.

To make a full-sized copy, keep the photocopier set at 100 percent image copy (no reduction) and copy the page using the tabloid-sized paper. Then re-position the scrapbook page by putting the opposite corner of the page at the "put page here" mark on the photocopier, and make another copy. Trim excess white space off the copies using scissors, then overlap them and tape them together on the back side.

Use a digital camera to take a picture of the scrapbook page, print that page on a high-quality printer and then photocopy that image. This technique is necessary for pages that have decorations that lift a significant amount off the surface of the page.


If your scrapbook page has a high-gloss image or mirrored decorations, the quality of the photocopy may be significantly reduced.


Some people scrapbook images that are copyrighted. Be careful about circulating copyrighted material publicly without proper attribution, as this could be a violation of federal copyright law.

About the Author

Jason Gillikin is a copy editor and writer who specializes in health care, finance and consumer technology. His various degrees in the liberal arts have helped him craft narratives within corporate white papers, novellas and even encyclopedias.