How to Make a Railroad Engineer's Costume

By Lauren Griffin ; Updated September 15, 2017

Things Needed

  • T-shirt
  • Striped overalls
  • White fabric paint
  • Cap
  • Iron-on patches
  • Iron
  • Bandanna
Embrace the look of a railroad engineer this Halloween.

Travel back in time to an era where locomotives were the only way to cross the country with a railroad engineer costume. The signature uniform of a railroad engineer or conductor makes it an easily recognizable costume that's bound to impress other party goers or trick-or-treaters. This comfortable costume is easy to put together and relies on many articles of clothing that you may already own, making it a great choice for last-minute Halloween parties.

For the top of the outfit, wear a T-shirt. A basic white or navy T-shirt complements the colors of the denim and provides a clean-cut look for the railroad uniform.

Find a pair of denim overalls, preferably ones with thin white vertical stripes. A classic looking pair of overalls with straight or wide legs and buttoned straps will look the most authentic. For plain overalls, wear them as they are or add white stripes by carefully drawing thin lines down the cloth using white fabric paint.

Purchase a cap. A traditional railroad worker cap with a flat front and pleated sides is ideal, but a simple baseball cap will also work. Try to find a cap that matches the stripes in the overalls.

Add badges to the overalls and cap to give the costume the look of a uniform. Iron-on patches of trains or railroads to the front of the cap, as well as the front pocket on the overall bib.

Tie a bandanna around your neck. While a red bandanna adds a punch of color to the ensemble, any color will work.

Slip your feet into some work boots. Black, brown or tan work shoes or boots have a rugged look that's perfect for life on the rails.

About the Author

Lauren Griffin began writing professionally in 2010. Her articles appear on various websites, specializing in academics, food and other lifestyle topics. Griffin attended Columbia University and holds a Bachelor of Arts in psychology.