How to Make a Person Out of Binder Clips

By Jeffery Keilholtz
Binder clips have rotating silver metal brackets.

Binder clips are useful for creating all kinds of craft projects. Making a person out of binder clips, for example, demands several of the same rules it takes to make any other living creature -- like a reindeer. Both humans and animals require various sizes of binder clips -- large, medium and small -- and creative folding and clipping procedures to generate your preferred design. Follow the proceeding steps to show you how to fashion a binder clip man in no time.

Arrange one large binder clip so that the silver metal brackets are extended long ways -- out in front. Place this clip aside for use in Step 3.

Pull back the silver metal brackets on two medium binder clips so they make a "V" shape. Place them side by side.

Pinch the brackets to open the black steel jaws for the clip on the right. Insert the extended metal brackets on the large binder clip into the jaws. Shift the large clip all the way to the left -- so that half of the brackets remain exposed. Close the jaws on the medium clip to hold the large clip in place.

Clip the second medium clip to the remaining area on the large exposed brackets. You have now created two legs -- medium brackets -- and the body -- large bracket -- of the binder clip man.

Fold two small binder clips so their brackets make the "V" shape. Clip one small clip to the left side of the large bracket. Clip the other small clip to the right side of the large bracket. You have now created arms and hands.

Pinch open a medium clip and connect it straight down onto the top of the large bracket. You will now have two medium brackets aiming upwards in a "V" shape.

Adjust a small clip so that the brackets are extended forward. Lightly clip the extended brackets over the backside medium "V" bracket from step six. This forms the head and now your binder clip man is complete.

About the Author

Jeffery Keilholtz began writing in 2002. He has worked professionally in the humanities and social sciences and is an expert in dramatic arts and professional politics. Keilholtz is published in publications such as Raw Story and Z-Magazine, and also pens political commentary under a pseudonym, Maryann Mann. He holds a dual Associate of Arts in psychology and sociology from Frederick Community College.