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How to Make a Men's Necklace

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Men’s necklaces have more simple designs than women’s necklaces. Most men’s necklaces consist of a link chain or cord design with one pendant in the center. You can make a men’s necklace designed specifically for the recipient by selecting a pendant tailored to his interests. Pendants are available in a wide variety of materials and styles to suit masculine tastes. Your choices include metal crosses, dog tags, shells, amulets and free form abstract art pieces.

Cut a length of rattail beading cord to the desired length of your men’s necklace. Rattail beading cord is a thick satin cord available in a variety of colors.

Cover one end of the rattail cording with a small amount of jeweler’s glue. Insert the same end into the wire chamber of a spring coil end connector. A spring coil end connector has a tightly wrapped wire spiral on one end and a closed loop on the other. This jewelry finding allows you to connect many different types of cording to a clasp.

Hold your flat nose pliers over the last two spirals on the connector. Press down so that the spirals grab the rattail cording.

Thread the pendant over the open end of the rattail cording.

Apply jeweler’s glue to the open end of the cording and insert it into another spring end. Press the last two spirals down onto the cording. Let the glue dry.

Open a jump ring with your flat nose pliers. Jump rings are thin metal circles with a slit that you can separate to open. Slip the jump ring over the closed loop on one of the spring ends. Thread one section of the lobster claw clasp over the jump ring. Close the ring. Repeat this step to add the remaining section of the lobster claw clasp to the other end of the necklace.

About the Author

Katherine Kally is a freelance writer specializing in eco-friendly home-improvement projects, practical craft ideas and cost-effective decorating solutions. Kally's work has been featured on sites across the Web. She holds a Bachelor of Science in psychology from the University of South Carolina and is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists.