How to Make a Gift Card Envelope

By Lindsey Crafter

Gift cards are ideal for last-minute gifting situations and convenient for mailing to friends and family. Typically they're packaged on an unceremonious card, so why not spend a couple minutes to make your own? By presenting your gift card in a handmade envelope you're adding a thoughtful touch that will surely be appreciated! These envelopes can be made in batches -- so keep some on hand with your stationery to dress up a gift card in a moment's notice! This project is kid-friendly and perfect for personalized teacher gifts!

Paint abstract colors with acrylic paint on the manila folders or card stock and let dry completely. If you're in a rush , you can expedite your drying time with a hair dryer.

Using a straight edge, trace a 2 1/2-by-6 3/4-inch rectangle on a manila folder and cut out. Fold in half and ensure your gift card fits inside -- this will serve as a template so you can trace multiple gift card holders quickly.

On one end of your envelope template trace a small semi-circle notch and cut out, this will allow gift cards to be removed easily without tearing the envelope.

Using your template trace several envelopes out of your dried artwork, cut them out, and fold in half.

Thread a 12-inch length of embroidery floss in a needle and knot the end. Starting at the bottom of the envelope (the side with the fold) back-stitch or straight stitch the sides together before knotting again at the top of the envelope. Repeat on the other side and trim off any extra thread.

Tip

If you're unfamiliar with these stitches you can find a back stitch tutorial here.

You can finish your gift card envelopes by adding labels or stickers for writing messages. Send to a friend via mail or use as a cute tie-on for a wrapped present!

About the Author

Lindsey Crafter is your go-to crafting and styling guru. She graduated from the Fashion Institute in New York City, but left the industry to pursue crafting and sewing instruction. In her free time, she enjoys creating alternative jewelry, haggling at flea markets,and pushing the limits of renovating her rental apartment.