How to Hem With a Serger

By Kathryn Hatter
Make a hemline neat by serging the edge of the fabric.

Hemming a garment involves measuring, pressing and then sewing the hem where you need it with careful stitches. As you turn under the edge of the fabric, finishing this raw edge will give your garment a more professional appearance and help prevent fraying. Sew a hem with a serger to overlock the raw edge quickly and attractively, giving your finished item a neat look.

Measure the item along the hemline to determine where you wish to place the hem. Use the sewing ruler and mark the point where you will turn under the fabric for the hem all along the edge of the fabric.

Place the fabric into the serger to serge the raw edge of the fabric before hemming. If the amount of fabric you will hem is more than about 1/2 an inch, align the fabric so you will trim the fabric as you serge the edge. If the amount of fabric you will hem is less than 1/2 an inch, align the raw edge of the fabric along the edge of the serger presser foot so you do not trim off any fabric as you serge the fabric edge.

Serge along the fabric, either serging the edge of the fabric only or trimming off excess fabric as you serge. Continue serging until you finish the entire raw edge of the fabric.

Fold and iron the fabric at the points you marked with the fabric marker along the entire edge to create the hem.

Pin the pressed edge of the fabric to hold it in place.

Sew the pinned edge of the fabric. Either hand stitch the hem in place with a needle and thread or stitch the hem with a sewing machine. The benefit of hand stitching is that the stitches will be less visible; however, machine stitching will create a more secure hemline. Remove the pins after sewing.

About the Author

Kathryn Hatter is a veteran home-school educator, as well as an accomplished gardener, quilter, crocheter, cook, decorator and digital graphics creator. As a regular contributor to Natural News, many of Hatter's Internet publications focus on natural health and parenting. Hatter has also had publication on home improvement websites such as Redbeacon.