How to Get Paid for Rapping

By Tyran DeWalt
Earn a living as a rapper.

With rap music being one of the forefront music genres, many opportunities are out there that can help you make a buck while doing what you love -- rapping. A little creativity can take you a long way. If you look at the career of major rap figures, you will notice that they have a distinct appearance and a signature rap style. You do not have to wait for major record labels to notice you before you start cashing in on your rap skills; get paid by maximizing your overall package and creating opportunities for yourself.

Create a mixtape. Ensure that your mixtape showcases the full range of your rapping ability. For example, include songs on the mixtape that show your socially aware side and your party side. Make sure that you have a presentable mixtape cover, so that people take you seriously. Make as many copies of the mixtape as your money will allow. Set the mixtape for sell at about $3 to $6.

Keep mixtapes in your car at all times in case someone wants to buy one. Visit local clubs and hip hop clothing stores. Ask the owners if you can sell your mixtape in their establishment. Discuss the percentage that you are willing to give them. If they agree, ask them if you can display poster advertisements.

Send local music producers demos of your work. Contact the producers and tell them why you want to work with them and what you have to offer. Ask them what they thought about your work. Give them ideas about collaborations with their artists. Tell them that you would be willing to offer your services and firmly set your rate. You probably have a better chance of getting paid if you are willing to negotiate your rates.

Create an account on social networks, such as Myspace and Facebook. Add all the people you know as friends as well as other rap artists and producers. Express in the bio of the page that you are a professional musician with material for sale. Join as many music groups as possible.

About the Author

A family therapist and graduate of the University of Louisville, Tyran DeWalt has written relationship and holistic self-care practice advice for close to a decade. DeWalt relishes in being able to combine his zeal for writing and his commitment to assisting people manage everyday life challenges.