How to Draw Train Tracks

By Andrea Hermitt

Drawing train tracks is an easy exercise that can teach scale and perspective. It can also provide insight into making landscape sketches look more realistic. With a little practice, your train track drawings will grow richer with detail and give you the confidence to undertake more challenging objects.

Start by drawing a horizontal line across the paper. This is your horizon line. The horizon line separates the sky from the ground. You can place a horizon line anywhere on the paper, but since you want to draw train tracks, you should put it near the top of the paper.

Choose a point anywhere on the horizontal line. This is your vanishing point, which is the point where the train tracks will disappear into the horizon.

Draw two lines from the vanishing point to the edge of the page. The lines should be under the vanishing line. When you are just beginning to learn to draw train tracks, your lines should be symmetrical on the page coming from the vanishing point and making an upside-down V on the page.

Draw horizontal lines on the page within the "V" shape to mark the tracks. Start at the bottom with your lines further apart. As you get closer to the dot, make your lines closer together.

Draw details in the front railroad ties to make them look more realistic and closer to you. Draw random lines and squiggles on every other space to give the look of rough wood grain. Also, draw your side rails by starting at the vanishing point and drawing another line on each side of the tracks.

Add other features to the page to balance out the picture. In this picture, I have drawn gravel on each side of the tracks, and then grass on their side of that. Then I have added clouds to the sky.

Tip

Always use the vanishing point on the page as a reference for other details. Draw items at the bottom of the page with more detail and larger to give your image proper perspective.

About the Author

Andrea Hermitt is an artist and writer who loves to research and write about new things. She's been a content writer since 2000, contributing to Families.com, the blog Notes From A Homeschooling Mom and other online publications. Hermitt has a Bachelor of Arts in fine art and English from the State University of New York at Albany.