How to Draw Rabbits

By Andrew Dewitt
Draw Rabbits

Rabbits are just plain cute. Drawing your own rabbit can be a great way to add some graphics to a class project. It can also be a fun family activity for children who are rabbit enthusiasts. The best way to draw a rabbit is to break it down into recognizable and simple geometric shapes and slowly layer details on top of this basic frame. Once you have identified the main shapes that compose a rabbit, you can use them as a template for all your future rabbit drawings and illustrations.

Draw two ovals for the head, one on top of the other. The bottom oval should be larger than the top. Draw the ears with two large oblong ovals coming out of the top of the head. Draw the body with a gumdrop shaped oval.

Add the feet with four small circles at the left and right side of the base of the body. Add eyes with two small ovals inside the upper portion of the head. Add a small triangle for the nose where the bottom at the bottom of the upper circle.

Draw the mouth with an upside down "Y" shape under the nose. Add a curved line under this. Create the inside of the ears with curved lines in the inside edges of each ear. These lines should taper until they meet with the outside edge. Add the rabbit's claws with three small curved cones on each foot.

Draw a curved line coming down from the eye toward the front foot on each side of the rabbit. This will separate the front portion of the body from the back. Erase all of the overlapping lines

Ink the entire drawing. Let the ink dry and carefully erase the pencil lines. Darken the rabbit's eyes and nostrils.

Tip

Large eyes and fuzzy appearance are parts of what make a rabbit cute. Make sure you draw the eyes large. You can create fur with small curved triangular shapes on the body of the rabbit.

Warning

Be sure to let the ink dry before you start erasing the pencil, or the lines will smudge.

About the Author

Andrew DeWitt is a freelance writer/illustrator and stand-up comic with more than eight years of professional experience. He has written for Chicago Public Radio, Vocalo Radio, Second City Chicago, and The Lemming. DeWitt has a liberal arts degree with a double major in theater and creative writing.