How to Draw George Washington Step-by-Step for Kids

By Jeffery Keilholtz
Position a picture of George Washington nearby for inspiration.

Drawing George Washington is a creative way to highlight the first president of the United States. Washington led the American Revolution to victory against mighty imperial British military forces and is considered by many as one of the finest leaders in the nation's history. While his resume and legend are profound, you can learn to draw a likeness of this renowned leader. Take your time while proceeding to master your drawing and display your achievement with confidence.

Draw a large circle in the middle of the paper. Trace a narrow U-shaped loop on the outside of the lower right portion of the circle. These tracings will account for the overall face outline. Draw one curved line down from the bottom left of the circle and the bottom of the U-shape. Curve each line to the outside. The two curved lines will act as the neck and shoulders.

Draw a slightly curved line from the top of the circle to the bottom of the U-shape. Sketch two short horizontal lines through the center of the curved line. The three previous lines will center the features of the face.

Draw in two horizontal tear drop-shape eyes between the two short horizontal lines. Sketch Washington's nose below the horizontal lines -- centered on the vertical face line. Trace lips at the center point where the vertical face line meets the bottom portion of the circle. Add shading around each eye for depth and texture.

Make an L-shaped loop approximately one inch of the bottom left corner of the circle and connect it to the neck line. The L-shaped loop will act as the bottom portion of the hair outline. Trace in a neck sash and rigid uniform collar around the neck and shoulder area.

Finish Washington's hair. Use thick layers or thin lines and narrow feather-like loops to add fullness to the hair. Draw in hair over the left portion of the circle -- until it covers almost half of the left side of the circle. Round the hair up to the top of the head in a widow's peak. Sketch a smaller backwards L-shaped curve off the outer portion of the right side of the circle -- and shade in as necessary -- to add hair, as well.

Shade in and color the picture as you see fit. Use various shades of beige for skin tone. Consider heavy blues and grays for the uniform collar and whites and grays to color the hair.

About the Author

Jeffery Keilholtz began writing in 2002. He has worked professionally in the humanities and social sciences and is an expert in dramatic arts and professional politics. Keilholtz is published in publications such as Raw Story and Z-Magazine, and also pens political commentary under a pseudonym, Maryann Mann. He holds a dual Associate of Arts in psychology and sociology from Frederick Community College.