How to Draw Breasts

By Gabriella Sannino ; Updated September 15, 2017

Drawing women’s breasts is an essential part of drawing the female form, and it is what makes the composition interesting from an artistic point of view. Breasts need to be drawn softly, and curvaceously. It is important to remember that there really aren’t any round or linear forms when drawing the body but it is all done with curves.

It is a little difficult to draw breasts, because most people want to draw them too far up or too pointy or too round. You want to make your subject look more natural and softer. You don't want your female form to look like she has silicone implants, so just keep curves in mind instead of lines or circles. The following tutorial will help you draw breasts in a more natural way.

Draw a central guideline right down the middle of the body. If your body is in movement or curved then your central line needs to move with it but keep right in the center of your body form.

Find your collarbone as a starting point.

Draw the breast curves at about 45 degree down from the collar bone. This will be about half way down the chest.

Watch that you don’t place the breasts either too far apart or too close together.

Don't draw balloons. breasts are not drawn like round circles. Many artists both professional and amateur draw balloons on the chest.

Draw the breast in the shape of a half sphere or even like an upside down cup.

Pay attention to shading. Shade heavier just under the breast in the crease then use light shading on the lower portion of the breast.

Look at the shoulders. A large part of making the breasts right, is making sure that the shoulders are placed correctly too. Make sure that the shoulders are drawn in a sloping fashion. Shoulders are not flat but slope slowly down.

Tip

Drawing the female body, including the breasts is not difficult, but a key factor is to really observe what the body looks like. It is different from the way we think it is. There are no real geometrical forms or straight lines, everything curves and if you follow these guidelines, drawing the female form and breast will be much easier.

About the Author

An Italian citizen with over 20 years in the Internet business, Gabriella Sannino knows a few things about marketing and communication. Graduating from the University of Texas in the mid '80s, she moved to New York to work for a small advertising agency. While there, she became fascinated with how people were interacting with new the new technology… the Internet.