How to Crochet a Lacy Scarf

By Kelli Nottingham
Metallic yarn creates a shimmery scarf for dressy occasions.

Crochet takes on a delicate, ethereal feel when used to create lace designs. Although some lace patterns may be complicated, it is possible for even a novice to crochet lace using basic crochet stitches combined into simple, easy-to-remember designs. Scarves are an appropriate project for using lace, and a delicate crocheted version adds a soft, feminine touch to any wardrobe. Wool yarns add a touch of warmth in cooler weather, and cotton, silk, or bamboo yarns allow you to make a decorative scarf for summer.

Make 24 chain stitches, turn.

Chain 5, skip 3 stitches, (1 single crochet, chain 3, 1 single crochet) in next stitch. Repeat the set of stitches between the asterisks across, ending with 5 chain stitches. Skip 3 stitches, and make 1 single crochet in the last stitch of the row, turn.

Chain 5, (1 single crochet, chain 3, 1 single crochet) in the 3rd stitch of the chain 5. Repeat this set of stitches across, ending with 5 chain stitches. Make 1 single crochet in the last stitch of the row, turn.

Repeat Step 3 until the scarf measures 60 inches or the desired length.

Crochet to the last stitch on the final row and cut the yarn, leaving a 4-inch tail. Insert the tail through the last stitch and pull to tighten.

Weave in all loose ends using the yarn needle.

Tip

Change directions at least once when weaving in the ends on a scarf. The result is more secure when threading the yarn through several stitches and then back on itself. This is particularly important for scarves, whose ends tend to get handled more often than other crochet items.

Add or subtract stitches from the beginning chain if you want to make the scarf wider or narrower because there is no gauge for this pattern. Use a multiple of 4 chain stitches to keep the design correct.

This pattern creates a design known as a picot stitch. The small knot of stitches that results from the chain 3 between the single crochet stitches is called a picot and can be worked into many crochet patterns to create texture.

About the Author

Kelli Nottingham has been a freelance writer for more than five years, with published works on topics ranging from international travel to home decor DIY projects. A graduate of Duke University and the University of Colorado, Nottingham holds degrees in anthropology of religion, with a focus on religious ritual. She is also a recognized professional speaker with national experience.