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How to Create Your Own Script Writing Tattoos

By Maude Coffey ; Updated September 15, 2017
A calligraphy font to consider for a tattoo

Flowing cursive letters in a tattoo bring a sense of respect and beauty to the design. Names, song lyrics, bible passages and military terms are examples of popular script tattoos. Script tattoos are more frequently tattooed in black and gray tones instead of color. A script tattoo contains a word or phrase and can stand alone as a tattoo. Tattoo artists also give the option of placing the script in a banner to produce the illusion of the words or phrase wrapping around or going through a picture design, such as a cross or rose.

Contact a calligrapher in your local area. Calligraphers produce handwritten script for wedding invitations or certificates. Explain to the calligrapher that the text will be reproduced into a tattoo, to avoid a copyright issue.

Download a free script font to your computer. Type the word or phrase for the tattoo into a blank page on a word processing program. Enlarge or shrink the script for the tattoo, as well as change the color with the word processing program. Find a backup font, because some fonts may not transfer into a tattoo design.

Ask a tattoo artist to draw the script. Tattoo artists draw for a living and are capable of producing a script, whether the script is cursive or more in depth with detail. The advantage of the tattoo artist drawing the script is the tattoo is drawn specifically for you and at the correct size for tattooing.

Draw the script yourself. Purchase books, such as a book of Celtic font examples, to reference and draw inspiration from. Use a copy machine or scanner to modify the size of the script tattoo after drawing.

Tip

Consult with a language school if your script tattoo is in a language that is unfamiliar to you.

Ask the tattoo artist to fill in or shade the inside of the script with the color of your choice.

Warning

Never receive a tattoo from a person who is not a professional tattoo artist.

About the Author

Maude Coffey retired after 10 years working as a professional body modification artist in the tattoo industry. She is certified in principles of infection control and blood-borne pathogens. Coffey received additional training and classes, such as anatomy, jewelry standards and aftercare, from the Association of Professional Piercers. Coffey aims to educate about safe tattooing and piercing practices while writing for various websites.