How to Create a Medieval Manor

By Jeffery Keilholtz ; Updated September 15, 2017

Things Needed

  • 4-by-16 inch cardboard wall pieces (2)
  • 8-by-8 inch cardboard roof pieces (2)
  • 4-by-18 inch cardboard wall piece
  • 8-by-18 inch cardboard roof piece
  • Permanent epoxy
  • 3-by-12 inch cardboard courtyard wall pieces (9)
  • 5 cups water
  • 1 cup flour
  • Pot
  • Medium size pot
  • 1-by-3 inch newspaper strips
  • 1-by-3 inch white paper towel strips
  • Acrylic paints
  • Paint brushes
Use an image of a real Medieval manor as inspiration.

Making a Medieval manor house is a creative means of expressing your passion for early European society. A Medieval manor house, according to Britain Express, was a basic rectangular complex -- similar to a mansion or compound -- used for living, eating or conducting business. The manor yard was encased by stone walls where a gateway arch provided access. Once your model manor house is complete, display it for friends, family or fellow Medieval enthusiasts to see.

Lay one of the 4-by-16 inch cardboard wall pieces onto a flat surface. Adjust the piece so one of the 4-inch sides is facing you. Bend the bottom 4-inch edge 2 inches up over the rest of the body. Bend the bottom edge up eight inches. Bend the bottom edge up 2 inches. Sit the piece up on its short edges. You now have one set of rectangular manor house walls. Bond the free edges of the piece together with epoxy. Repeat for the second 4-by-16 inch piece.

Lay one of the 8-by-8 inch cardboard wall pieces onto a flat surface. Adjust the piece so one of the 8 inch sides are facing you. Bend the bottom half over the top half to form a "V" roof shape. Fit the roof over top the first set of manor house walls. Bond the roof to the manor with permanent epoxy. Repeat for the second 8-by-8 inch piece.

Lay one of the 4-by-18 inch cardboard wall pieces onto a flat surface. Adjust the piece so one of the 4-inch sides is facing you. Bend the bottom edge up two inches over the rest of the body. Bend the bottom edge up 9 inches. Bend the bottom edge up 2 inches. Sit the piece up on its short edges. You now have third set of rectangular manor house walls. Bond the free edges of the piece together with permanent epoxy.

Lay one of the 8-by-18 inch cardboard wall pieces onto a flat surface. Adjust the piece so one of the 8-inch sides is facing you. Bend the bottom half over the top half to form a "V" roof shape. Fit the roof over top the third set of manor house walls. Bond the roof to the manor with permanent epoxy.

Fit the third manor house in between the first two manor houses to form an "H" shape. Bond the houses together with permanent epoxy. The entire manor residence is now complete.

Measure and cut nine 3-by-12 inch cardboard courtyard wall pieces. Fit and bond three pieces together into a three dimensional U-shaped object with permanent epoxy. Flip the U-shape so the bottom side of the "U" is facing up. Repeat for the remaining pieces. You now have three 3-by-12 inch courtyard wall pieces.

Glue one end of a courtyard wall to the back left side of the manor residence. Repeat for the right manor residence side. Bond the third courtyard wall to the free ends of the first two walls to create a U-shaped with the three walls. The Medieval manor body is now complete.

Combine the water and flour to the pot to create a paper mache mix. Boil the mix for three minutes. Allow the mix to cool for five minutes. Pour the mix into a medium size bowl.

Soak one newspaper strip in the mix. Press the strip into the manor. Continue until the manor residence and walls are entirely covered in one layer of paper mache. Repeat with the white paper towel strips. Paper towel provides an ideal surface for acrylic paint. Allow four hours for the manor to dry.

Coat the manor in acrylic paint. Paint a stone or brick pattern onto the residence and courtyard walls. Paint multiple windows and doors onto the manor. Paint an archway at the center on both sides of the courtyard wall that runs parallel to the residence itself. Allow two hours for the manor to dry before handling or displaying.

About the Author

Jeffery Keilholtz began writing in 2002. He has worked professionally in the humanities and social sciences and is an expert in dramatic arts and professional politics. Keilholtz is published in publications such as Raw Story and Z-Magazine, and also pens political commentary under a pseudonym, Maryann Mann. He holds a dual Associate of Arts in psychology and sociology from Frederick Community College.