How Do I Get My Longaberger Handle Fixed?

By Jenny Parker ; Updated April 12, 2017
Longaberger will repair your damaged basket.

The Longaberger Co., headquartered in Newark, Ohio, sells handcrafted wooden baskets via its website and through Independent Home Consultants all over the United States. Although Longaberger baskets are made to be durable and last for years, accidents do happen. If you find yourself with a broken handle on one of your Longaberger baskets, you can send it in to the company to have it professionally repaired and returned to you as good as new.

Visit the Longaberger website and click on “Visit Us” at the top of the page. From the drop-down menu, select “Basket Restoration Form.”

Print the Basket Restoration Form. Three copies will be printed; one is for you to keep for your reference. The other two are “office copies” that must be mailed in with the basket.

Fill out the forms with your name, mailing address, e-mail and phone number. You will also have to include the year and item number of your basket as well as a description of the damage to the handle.

Pack your basket carefully in a shipping box. Include the two office copies of the repair form, and ship it to the address on the form.

Wait for Longaberger to contact you with an estimate for the cost to repair your basket’s handle. You will receive your estimate via e-mail if you provide an e-mail address, or regular mail if you do not.

Follow the instructions on the estimate form to submit payment, then allow six to eight weeks for your basket to be repaired and returned to you. If you would rather not pay for repairs, your unrepaired basket will be shipped back to you at your expense.

Tip

A Basket Restoration Form also can be obtained from a Longaberger Independent Home Consultant.

About the Author

Jenny Parker is a New England-based entrepreneur who has been writing since 1995. Parker writes extensively on creative self-employment and genealogy; her work has appeared on Etsy.com and Ancestry.com. She also has self-published several short story collections and is currently working on her first non-fiction book chronicling the history of her ancestors in America.