Directions for UNO Moo

By Andrea Reuter

Uno Moo!, for two to four players ages 3 and older, is a three-dimensional version of the classic card game. Designed for preschoolers, Uno Moo! includes animal figures of different colors that live in a barn. Players take turns matching their own hidden figures to the figure displayed at the top of the barn. As in the Uno card game, some figures have special rules that help or hurt players. The first person to play all of their hidden figures wins the game of Uno Moo!

Put all 28 Uno Moo! figures in the barn.

Give each player a cardboard haystack partition. Place the partitions in front of each player with the "Uno" symbol facing out.

Take five Uno Moo! figures from the barn and place them behind your haystack so that the other players can't see them. Wait for the other players to take their five pieces.

Remove one additional piece from the barn and place the roof on the building. Put the figure on the ledge of the barn door.

Start the game with the youngest player and move clockwise around the playing area, with each player playing one figure per turn.

Match one of your figures to the figure on the barn door by either color or animal on your turn. Push the existing figure on the door into the barn and replace it with your own.

Draw another figure from the barn if you're unable to match any of your figures to the one on the door. Play this new figure if you're able to; otherwise, end your turn.

Play a farmer figure, which is wild, on a figure with any color or animal. Choose a color; this color must be played by the next person.

Play a skunk figure on another skunk or a figure of the same color to make the next player draw two figures and lose a turn.

Shout "Uno Moo!" when you have only one figure remaining behind your partition. Draw two figures from the barn if you forget to say "Uno Moo!" and one of your opponents catches you before the next person takes a turn.

Place all of your figures in the barn to win "Uno Moo!"

About the Author

Andrea Reuter has a Bachelor of Arts in liberal arts from the New School. She has worked as a magazine writer and editor for such publications as "Diversion" magazine and "Original Logic Problems." Reuter currently writes articles about video games and consoles, board games and card games for various websites.