Differences Between Monthly, Weekly & Daily Newspapers

By Casey Hynes
Different types of newspapers provide diverse perspectives on current events.

Newspapers were once the sole source of news in a community. Single broadsheet newspapers eventually underwent an evolution that spawned three different approaches to informing and entertaining the public. The daily, the weekly and the monthly newspaper formed a trifecta that takes the audience beyond the basic who, what, where, when and why of journalism.

Dailies

A daily newspaper is exactly what it sounds like: a publication that is printed every day. These usually consist of a news section, with either straight news reports or analysis, opinion pages, a sports section and an arts and entertainment guide. Dailies, which were once the go-to source for what was going on in the world, now face a battle against online news organizations.

Weekly Newspapers

Unlike dailies, weekly publications examine and expand on the news rather than trying to break it. Weekly papers such as New York City-based The Village Voice take a step back from the daily news grind, often giving a perspective on the week that's past or the one that is ahead. Features often include profiles of public figures who are involved with a hot-button issue, or a piece offering a long-view look at what's coming up in the arts scene.

Monthly Publications

Monthly publications appeal to those looking for in-depth coverage of current events, or features that take an alternative look at what is going on in the world. They don't attempt to break news but have the advantage of time. Because they only publish once a month, articles can be planned out and worked on by reporters for weeks at a time, which usually results in well-sourced and informative stories for the audience.

The Future of Newspapers

Although most newspapers have tried to evolve and adapt to the digital age by developing their own websites, most are struggling to compete with news sites that not only break news faster but offer interactive elements that enhance the story.

About the Author

Casey Hynes began writing in 2008. She has written news and features for "Roll Call," a Capitol Hill newspaper. Hynes holds a Master of Science in journalism from Columbia University.