Blind Stitch Instructions for a Singer Sewing Machine

By Autumn Birt

Things Needed

  • Sewing machine
  • Blind hem foot
  • thread
Blind hemming is made easy with modern sewing machines.

Blind stitch, also known as a blind hem stitch, is a sewing technique that creates a nearly invisible hem. Though it looks complicated, the skill is easy to master and an efficient way of hemming countless projects. Singer Sewing Machines make the task every easier with a special stitch and foot.

Attach the blind hem foot by snapping it onto the presser foot rod.

Thread the sewing machine with a thread that closely matches the color of fabric to be sewn. This will ensure the most invisible hem possible.

Fold the raw hem back to the proper hem length.

Fold the project fabric back from the hem so that 1/8 of an inch of the raw hem is showing. The hemmed fabric will be on the bottom with the exposed 1/8 inch emerging to one side. The remaining fabric will be on top and pulled away from the raw edge of the hem.

Insert the raw hem edge under the presser foot. You will be sewing mostly on the raw hem fabric with only every fourth or fifth stitch zigzagging over to catch the project fabric.

Sew a few stitches to ensure the zigzag stitch is just catching the project fabric. If it is not, adjust as needed.

Finish the stitch with a locking stitch or backwards/forwards stitch as you would a normal sewing fabric.

Tip

  1. Iron the hem before pulling the project fabric back and sewing. This will keep the hem smooth.

  2. Do not sew over pins as they may throw the stitching off and make the stitches visible.

  3. Sew a test piece first to check stitch length, thread tension, and needle size.

Warning

  1. Always be careful of the needle when moving fabric or removing pins so that you do not catch your finger.

About the Author

Autumn Birt has written professionally since 1992. Her work has been published in "The Red Wheelbarrow" and on Europeanvisits.com. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in English and studio art from Bucknell University and a Master of Science degree in ecology and environmental science from the University of Maine.