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How to Use a Pioneer 101 Bounty Hunter Metal Detector

Metal detectors detect the presence of metals underground.

If you are a collector of coins or other rare items, you know that you can find some of these items in outdoors locations such as a park or the beach. To help you locate items underground, a metal detector can be extremely useful. The Pioneer 101 Bounty Hunter Metal Detector is one model you can use to help you locate buried items during your treasure hunt. This model fits on your arm and has a control panel you will use to operate the device.

Turn the "Sensitivity" switch to the right until you hear a click and the "Power" light turns on to indicate you have powered up the metal detector. Turn the knob over until it lines up with the "3" position, which is the optimal sensitivity. If you hear a lot of static or random beeping from the unit, turn the sensitivity down to reduce interference.

Move the "Mode" toggle switch to the position that corresponds to the type of searching you want to do. Moving it to the middle position will turn the detector to "All Metal" mode in which all types of metal will be detected.

Move the switch to the left to turn on "Full Discriminate" mode that will prevent trash items from being detected. Move it to the right to use the "Tone Discriminate" mode that will cause two different tones to be heard depending on if the object is trash or more valuable.

Insert your arm through the arm sling and grasp the handle of the detector firmly. Walk in a straight line with the coil about 1 to 2 inches above the ground. As you walk, slowly sweep the coil back and forth, keeping it level with the ground as you go.

Stop when you hear a beep from the unit. Depending on your settings, beeps indicate that objects are located underground at that location. Move the coil around until you hear steady beeping to zero in on the location of the item.

About the Author

Chris Waller began writing in 2004. Chris has written for the "Fulton Sun" and eHow, focusing on technology and sports. Chris has won multiple awards for his writing including a second place award in the Missouri Press Association's Better Newspaper Contest. Chris earned Bachelor of Arts degrees in journalism and English from Truman State University.