Spiderman Crafts for Kids

By Janice Fahy ; Updated September 15, 2017
Spiderman crafts are fun for young superhero lovers.

If Spiderman has found a place of esteem in your little boy's heart, mind and imagination, you're in good company. Many children, even girls, go through an intense and lengthy phase of superhero worship, and Spiderman is usually at the top of the list. These cool Spiderman crafts are great for a birthday or Halloween party.

Spiderman Face Painting

Children love face painting, and it’s easy to give each a Spiderman face. Paint a white area around the child’s eyes. Paint the rest of his face red. Outline the white eye area with black. Add web lines. Take a photo of each child..

Spiderman Picture Frame

Let kids create a simple Spiderman picture frame. This is easily done by kids of all ages. Buy some basic cardboard craft frames and provide the kids with glue and a variety of decorating materials such as glitter, paint, markers, Spiderman stickers, foam spiders, letters and pieces of string for webs. Let each child design his own masterpiece. Once the frames are dry, trim the face painting photo so that it slips easily into the picture area.

Spiderman Web Craft

For the Spiderman web craft, you'll need black, blue and red yarn, black pipe cleaners, large black pom poms, a hot glue gun and plastic googly eyes. You also must allow the kids to turn a room or an area-inside or outside-into a gigantic Spiderman web. Let the kids make the web by weaving the string all over the place, draping it onto pieces of furniture or attaching it to trees and branches. It's best to start by securing the basic form of the web to a central location and then working your way outward.

To make the spiders, cut four pipe cleaners in half to create eight legs. Have a grown up use the hot glue gun to secure the legs and the wiggly eyes to the pom poms. After the spiders dry, attach them all over the web and let the kids play in it.

About the Author

Janice Fahy is a freelance writer who is comfortable researching and writing on just about any topic under the sun. With a professional history that includes more than 15 years of writing for newspapers, magazines, law firms and private Web clients, she also writes for Break Studios, eHow and Trails.