Pig Craft With a Milk Jug

By Kristen Marquette ; Updated September 15, 2017
Use empty toilet paper rolls as legs for the pig craft.

Recycle an empty plastic milk jug and turn it into a pig craft. This project is appropriate for children ages 6 to 8 who are learning about farm animals or who just really like pigs. While the basic craft involves laying the jug on its side, painting it and using the cap as the snout, you can still make your pig craft one of a kind.

Milk Jug

Create a family of milk jug pigs. Use gallon milk jugs to create large, robust adult pigs and half-gallon milk jugs to make smaller, skinner piglets. Once you decide which size milk jugs you want to use, decide how you want to position the milk jug handle. If you position the jug so that the handle faces the floor, your milk jug will look more pig-like. When you lay the jug on its side with the handle facing up, you distort the face and overall appearance of the craft, but you can transport the craft easier.

Color

Using acrylic paint, give your craft color. While the color pink usually comes to mind when someone say the word "pig," these barnyard animals also come in black, brown and white. Some breeds of pigs even have spots, so you are not limited to making a plain pink pig. Or have some fun with the craft and make your pig stand out by painting it blue, orange or red. Whichever color you choose, sand the plastic a little before painting so the paint adheres better. You may even want to apply a coat of primer first.

Face

Your milk jug pig needs a face. Draw two nostrils on the jug cap to make the pig snout with a permanent black marker. Above the nose, draw two large dots on the jug as eyes. Alternatively, glue on two googly eyes. You could also use acrylic paint to paint on the eyes or cut the eyes out of card stock, construction paper or foam and glue them onto the face. Give the pig craft some personality by drawing on eyebrows or eyelashes. You can even glue fake eyelashes on the eyes.

Pig Bank

Make your pig craft functional by turning it into a piggy bank. Cut a slot in the top of the jug with a craft knife. Insert spare coins or paper money in the slot. When you want to get the money out, just unscrew the cap and pour it out.

About the Author

Kristen Marquette has been a professional writer since 2009 when FireLight Books published her debut novel, "The Vampiric Housewife." Since 2000 she has helped students hone their written and verbal skills in English as a tutor. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree from Michigan State University.