How to Make a PVC Arch

By Patti Perry
PVC pipes can be used to make many sizes of arches.

PVC arches are fashioned for wedding and party decoration foundations. They are also combined in rows to build greenhouse and high-tunnel framing or as a form in earth-bag construction. The height and strength of a PVC arch is adjusted for its intended use. The same technique is used, with larger components, to build bigger arches. Single PVC arches, employed as a decorative base, may need to be strapped or tethered to keep them stable.

Dig two 2-inch holes with a trowel. Space the holes 6 feet apart or adjust for the size arch you want.

Embed two 6-inch pieces of 1-inch PVC into these holes. Leave 4 inches above the ground. Firmly pack the soil around the pipe.

Drive a 2-foot-long stake of 3/8-inch rebar into each embedded PVC pipe. Use a heavy hammer to pound the rebar into the ground, keeping it vertical, until it is level with the top of the plastic pipe.

Cut a 6-inch piece of 1-inch PVC pipe. With a hacksaw, divide this piece lengthwise, to create two halves. These are collar pieces to connect the arch.

Cut 1/2-inch PVC into two lengths that are each 5 feet long.

Place a hose clamp around each of the 5-foot pieces of PVC.

Put the 5-foot pieces of PVC into the 1-inch pipes filled with rebar.

Bend the two 5-foot sections of PVC to form an arch and secure the collar halves at the apex with a hose clamp on each end. Tighten the clamps with a screwdriver.

Things Needed

  • Trowel
  • 1-inch PVC pipe, 18 inches
  • 3/8-inch rebar, 4 feet
  • Hacksaw
  • 1/2-inch PVC pipe, 10 feet
  • 2 hose clamps
  • Screwdriver

Tip

Indoor PVC arches can be embedded in earth-filled bags.

About the Author

Patti Perry is currently attending West Virginia University and expanding her knowledge base. She has worked as a freelance visual artist for 30 years, with specialties in watercolor and scherenschnitte. Originality of creation is her motivation and she continues to pursue this avenue in her writing. Perry is currently contributing articles to eHow.