How to Write Music

By Contributing Writer ; Updated September 15, 2017

Music is one of the oldest ways of communication and expression known to man. Composers in the making often want to know how to write music. To answer this question, some points should be referenced and kept in mind to obtain the best outcome.

Learn the mechanics. Writing music in a more conventional way may require the learning of notation. Many self teaching books and videos can be obtained at music stores and on the Internet. One can also take classes from an instructor who can teach the mechanics of music.

Choose your type. Think of the type of music you would like to write. You may even want to think about mixing different types and styles that suit you.

Write to please yourself first. Often we are our own biggest critics. When you can say you are generally pleased with the music you write, it will be felt by others like you.

Convey the message. Ask yourself what you would like to convey in the music you write. Either through lyrics or the tone of the instruments played, think of any and every minute detail you can add to your music to help listeners identify with your message. It is easier to work towards a clear and concise goal when it is identified.

Accept criticism. You may not always agree with critics but respect their opinions. Some of the opinions that are listened to objectively may help you to reach your goal when writing your music. Be sure that you take this criticism with a grain of salt, however, and don't let it discourage your progress.

Clear your mind. Be sure you don’t have lots of distractions when trying to compose. Distractions differ for each person who writes music and can range from being in complete tranquility to a hectic fast-paced atmosphere. Whatever your zone is, get in it to invoke your best work.

Tip

Surrounding yourself with other artists may also help to promote writing in a positive musical environment. This may also help you to write music.

Warning

Any music that is intended to be performed in front of an audience of strangers or those you may not trust should be copyrighted first.