How to Weave With Seagrass

By Kim Blakesley

Seagrass is available as a twisted grass rope or a flat-surfaced reed that resembles rush from the Sea Islands and is used in many folk art baskets, rugs, mats, placements and table runners. It is favored by weaving enthusiasts because the seagrass begins as a green-colored fiber that turns tan with age. Seagrass is easily dyed with fabric dye to take on any accent color. The rope-textured seagrass presents a natural appearance and adds an interesting texture to any table. Make 12- by 18-inch placemats out of seagrass to add a touch of nature to any table.

Cut 24 pieces of seagrass rope 18 inches long and 68 pieces of seagrass 12 inches long.

Place the 18-inch seagrass pieces on a horizontal plane with 1/2 inch between pieces. Make sure the ends of each piece align to make an 11- by 18-inch rectangle.

Find the center of the 18-inch pieces of seagrass. Weave one 12-inch seagrass piece through the 18-inch pieces at the center mark, using an over/under weaving pattern. Leave 1/2 inch of each end of the 12-inch seagrass exposed past the 18-inch rectangle.

Weave one 12-inch seagrass pieces over/under on each side of the center weaving. Start the weaving opposite of the first weave. For example, if you started the first weave going over the first 18-inch horizontal piece of seagrass, start the pieces on either side of that center weave by going under the first 18-inch horizontal piece.

Continue weaving the length of the seagrass mat, alternating from side to side of the center to keep the placemat squared. Always start the new weave opposite (over or under) the piece next it. Continue weaving the placemat until 1/2 inch of each 18-inch end is exposed. The finished placemat now has an edge, and you do not need to add a binding or hand weave a finished edge.

Tip

Use the same process to make a larger placement, table runner or rug. Change the lengths of the seagrass pieces to match the dimensions of the new rectangle.

About the Author

Kim Blakesley is a home remodeling business owner, former art/business teacher and school principal. She began her writing and photography career in 2008. Blakesley's education, fine arts, remodeling, green living, and arts and crafts articles have appeared on numerous websites, including DeWalt Tools, as well as in "Farm Journal" and "Pro Farmer."