How to Thread a Phaff 130 Sewing Machine

By Arin Bodden
The Pfaff 130 is quick and simple to thread.

The Pfaff corporation has made high-quality sewing machines for 140 years, and many of their older machines are still in use today. The Pfaff 130 was first manufactured in the 1950s, and was one the first heavy-duty machines available for the home sewer. The Pfaff 130 looks different than modern machines and hooks and knobs that could seem foreign if you are used to threading a contemporary sewing machine. Threading this machine is not that different than threading a modern sewing machine and can be accomplished in just a few minutes.

Load thread on the spool pin located on the top right of the sewing machine. Position it so that the thread tail pulls from behind the spool when it’s on the pin and the spool spins counter clockwise. Continue pulling the thread to the left.

Place the thread through the top hole in the tall metal pin on the top center of the machine, pulling from left to right.

Pull the thread down and to the left to the thread guide directly above the silver knob on the front left side of the machine. Pull the thread through the guide from right to left.

Pull the thread straight down and wrap it around the thread tension disc from right to left. Continue pulling the thread straight to the left.

Wrap the thread under the thread controller disc, located on the front left side of the sewing machine. Pull the thread straight up from the left side of the thread controller disc.

Place your thread through the thread guide located directly on top of the thread controller disc. Continue pulling the thread straight up.

Place the thread in the take-up lever, a silver lever on the top left-hand side of the machine. Pull the thread from right to left. Pull the thread straight down.

Place the thread in the thread guide directly beneath the thread take-up lever. Continue pulling the thread straight down through the thread guide above the needle.

Pull the thread down and place through the eye of the needle, pulling from left to right. Keeping pulling the thread so you have at least an eight-inch tail.

About the Author

Based in the Pacific Northwest, Arin Bodden started writing professionally in 2003. Her writing has been featured in "Northwest Boulevard" and "Mermaids." She received the Huston Medal in English in 2005. Bodden has a Master of Arts in English from Eastern Washington University. She currently teaches English composition and technical writing at the university level.