How to Take an Emo Picture by Yourself

By Rebecca McKeown
Getting the right angle is important when taking an emo photo of yourself.

The term "emo" originated with the 1980s hardcore music scene when a softer, more emotionally driven style of music was developed. That music launched the emo lifestyle, often categorized by teens with dark, side-swept bangs and square-frame glasses in tight pants and black band T-shirts.

Many people in the emo culture take pictures of themselves to express their identity. Since most emo photos are taken without the use of a self-timer, they can be tricky to get right. But with a few tips and a lot of patience, you can take the perfect emo photo of yourself.

Dress in dark clothing. Black or dark grey band T-shirts work well for emo photo shoots, as music is an important part of emo culture. Dark clothing also makes your skin appear paler. Skinny jeans, with studded or brightly colored belts, are a must for any emo photo. Skate shoes also complete the image.

Apply a light-colored foundation to your face to make your skin look paler, if needed. Line your eyes with thick, black eyeliner and mascara. Colored eyeshadow, like blue or purple, helps complete the look. Leave your lips and cheeks pale. Boys can add eyeliner if they want, or leave their face plain. Black accessories, such as watches, jelly bracelets and studded leather cuffs, can add more edge to the photo.

Set up a lamp or other light source so it faces the wall behind you. Stand in front of the wall and hold the camera high over your head and point it down toward your face. Look up at the camera or down to the floor as you take the photo.

Check your photo as you take it to make sure the lighting adds shadows to your face and body. If it doesn't, you can edit the contrast in a photo editing program. The photo should include some of your face. Have only a part of your face showing to add to the mood of your photo.

Play around with the lighting and camera position until you get a photo you like, then post it online for your friends to see.

Tip

Try taking the photo in the bathroom and pointing the camera at the mirror for a different effect.

Though many emo photos are taken inside, you can go outside for better lighting.

About the Author

Rebecca McKeown began writing professionally in 2007. She has written and taken photographs for newspapers and magazines like "The Livingston County News," "The Buzzworthy" and "The Communicator." McKeown served as the photo editor of her campus newspaper, "The Bona Venture," for four semesters. She obtained a bachelor's degree in journalism and mass communication as well as English from St. Bonaventure University.