How to Ship a Guitar

By Robert Russell

Guitars are shipped through the mail every day, and most of the time they arrive at their destination in one piece. This is because they have been packaged properly. Although guitars are fragile, it is actually quite easy to protect them during the shipping process. Of course, anytime you ship something valuable through the mail you should have it insured.

Purchase a guitar shipping box from the local music store. Guitar stores ship and receive guitars all the time and should have the right type of box.

Loosen the strings. Turn the tuners until the strings are loose and floppy. This will relieve the tension caused by the strings and protect the guitar during the shipping process.

Add protective padding inside the guitar case. First place the guitar in the case and then use crumpled newspapers to fill all the voids inside the case. The idea is to provide an extra cushion of protection for the guitar. Pay special attention to the neck and headstock area. If you do not have a guitar case, wrap the guitar in several layers of bubble wrap and secure it with tape.

Place a piece of tape over each of the locks of the guitar case. This provides a little extra security and keeps the locks from popping open.

Put crumpled newspaper into the box. Form a eight- to 10-inch cushion at the bottom of the box.

Place the guitar inside the box. Fill all the voids with crumpled newspaper. Close the box.

Write "fragile" and "handle with care" on the box. Use a marker to write the warnings on each side of the box.

Secure the box with shipping tape. Tape around all four sides. Place the mailing address on the box and it is ready to go.

About the Author

Robert Russell began writing online professionally in 2010. He holds a Ph.D. in philosophy and is currently working on a book project exploring the relationship between art, entertainment and culture. He is the guitar player for the nationally touring cajun/zydeco band Creole Stomp. Russell travels with his laptop and writes many of his articles on the road between gigs.