How to Set Up for 'Rock Band' Drum Set

By Matthew Anderson ; Updated September 15, 2017

“Rock Band” is a music simulation video game that was released in 2007. It was developed by Harmonix, the original developers for the “Guitar Hero” series. The game allows players to simulate the drums, guitar, bass or vocals along with the songs included in the game. The drum parts are played using a special controller shaped like an electronic drum set. This controller has four drum pads and a pedal used to play each drum note displayed on the screen.

Insert the two short rods into the holes on one of the black V-shaped pieces.

Insert the corresponding holes on the other black V piece onto the opposite side of the short rods. This forms the base of the drum set. The two holes on the top of both V pieces should be facing up.

Insert the two long rods into the holes on top of either V piece.

Insert the drum pads on top of the two long rods inserted into the base. There are two holes on the bottom of the drum pads that fits directly onto these rods.

Plug the cable connected to the drum pedal into the back of the drum pads. There is only one port for the pedal to plug into. A groove on the bottom of the drum pedal can be used to place it directly on top of the two rods used to form the base.

Plug the USB cable in the back of the drum pads into the game console.

Tip

The “Rock Band” drum set can be used to navigate menus like the guitar or a normal controller. The green drum pad corresponds to the “A” button. The red drum pad corresponds to the “B” button. The drum pedal corresponds to the “Y” button. The yellow drum pad is equivalent to pushing up on the direction pad. The blue drum pad is equivalent to pushing down on the direction pad.

Warning

The drum pedal included with the early versions of the “Rock Band” drum set is prone to snapping in half. Hold on to the warranty information and original receipt for the controller. You can get the drum pedal replaced by the manufacturer if you find that you have one of these faulty pedals.

About the Author

Matthew Anderson started as a writer and editor in 2003. He has written content used in a textbook published by Wiley Publishing, among other publications. Anderson majored in chemical engineering and has training in guitar performance, music theory and song composition.