How to Repair a Hi Hat Stand

By Robert Russell

Hi hat stands are an integral part of the contemporary drum kit. The hi hat stand makes it possible to play the hi hat cymbals with the drummer's left foot. The hi hat stand consists of a lower rod that forms the base of the hi hat and an upper rod. The upper rod is connected to the lower rod. A foot pedal is used to move the upper rod, with the top cymbal, up and down, striking the lower cymbal. Hi hat stands are subject to a number of problems. Routine maintenance and cleaning is necessary to keep hi hat stands in good working condition.

Loosen and remove the hi hat clutch from the hi hat stand. Remove the felt washer and the top cymbal. Loosen the bolt holding the bottom cymbal. Remove the bottom cymbals and felt washer.

Lubricate the moving parts of the hi hat stand with petroleum jelly (such as Vaseline); 20w or 50w car oils works as well. Lubricating the moving parts makes them move more efficiently. It also prevents squeaking noises.

Lubricate the nuts and bolts and screws on the hi hat stand with petroleum jelly. The hi hat stand has a number of T screws. The clutch that holds and controls the cymbals has two screws. One screw attaches the clutch to the pull rod and a second screw attaches the top cymbal to the hi hat stand.

Inspect the upper pull rod to see if it is bent. A bent pull rod prevents the hi hat from functioning properly. The upper pull rod is connected to the lower pull rod that sits in the base of the hi hat. Pull the tube cover off of the upper pull rod. Attempt to straighten the rod with a pair of pliers if it is bent. Replace the pull rod if you are unable to straighten it.

Inspect the hi hat clutch. The clutch takes lots of abuse from the hi hat cymbals. Hi hat clutches eventually wear out and need to be replaced. Use duct tape for a short-term repair. Cut a piece of duct tape into two long narrow strips. Wrap one piece of duct tape around the pull rod and make a lip large enough to hold the top cymbal in place. Place the top cymbal on the hi hat. Place the second piece of tape on top of the cymbal to secure it firmly in place.

About the Author

Robert Russell began writing online professionally in 2010. He holds a Ph.D. in philosophy and is currently working on a book project exploring the relationship between art, entertainment and culture. He is the guitar player for the nationally touring cajun/zydeco band Creole Stomp. Russell travels with his laptop and writes many of his articles on the road between gigs.