How to Plan a Sculpture Studio

By Contributor ; Updated September 15, 2017
Plan a Sculpture Studio

How to Plan a Sculpture Studio. Before you actually construct your sculpture studio, having it planned out ahead of time will make it so that the creation and moving in materials becomes an enjoyable experience as opposed to a haphazard mishmash of tools and equipment.

Measure the space using a tape measure. Draw a scaled down version of the space your studio will go in. Brainstorm where you would like to set up work stations and as a guide for how much space you have.

Decide on and measure your equipment. You will need one or more work tables for your construction of your sculptures. Consider work tables with wheels that lock in case you need to move your sculpture around the room without fear of it breaking once you pick it up. Use a tape measure to accurately measure your equipment, storage shelves, and any surfaces. Include these measurements in your original drawing of the space itself so you know exactly where each item will fit, or if you have something that cannot fit into the space.

Determine the function. If you are a sculptor that works primarily with metal, you need to consider the amount of space needed for welding. Making your space fireproof will be of major importance if you consistently work with high heat. If you work with clay you will need enough room for drying racks, work tables, a kiln, and tool storage.

Organize work stations. Build storage units within each area of the room that pertain to its necessity. Keep buckets by the sink, and wire and sculpting tools near the work table. If you work with metals, keep all materials within a comfortable distance of the work table. Storage will be a main component, and organization will become more important after you realize the amount of materials needed for any given project. The last thing you want is to be tripping over materials and equipment at any given time.

Make it safe. Make sure your kiln isn't near anything plastic in your space, and set apart from the rest of the room. Do the same for your welding center. Use a metal table to work with, keeping flammable materials like wood, chemicals, or paint away from the open flame of welding.

Ventilate your space. If you work with any kind of heat, dry materials of any sort, or paint you will need to make sure there is a ventilation system in place before you start bring in your equipment. A sculpture studio is meant for construction and finishing, so it'd bound to be dirty, but it is also prone to filling with fumes, dangerous dust, and many other normally harmful fumes if not properly ventilated.

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